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Thread: Life At The Lakehouse

  1. #341
    Quote Originally Posted by fuego View Post
    Cool!
    That is one of my cycling routes.

  2. #342
    Administrator fuego's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireBrand View Post
    That is one of my cycling routes.
    And I'm sure you're packin'.

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  4. #343
    Quote Originally Posted by fuego View Post
    And I'm sure you're packin'.
    “Condition One” and head on a swivel.

  5. #344
    My brother and I have been fishing the many small lakes around the area the past month. On the way out of the launch area of Lancaster Lake the other night, he slowed the truck and said “look at that”. Hanging from a tree branch is the remnant of a summer tent worm (gypsy moth) nest with a dead squirrel stuck in it. Strange sight.

    Life At The Lakehouse-078af69c-d747-4d4b-9bda-f3328c67d72f-jpg

  6. #345
    Quote Originally Posted by FireBrand View Post
    My brother and I have been fishing the many small lakes around the area the past month. On the way out of the launch area of Lancaster Lake the other night, he slowed the truck and said “look at that”. Hanging from a tree branch is the remnant of a summer tent worm (gypsy moth) nest with a dead squirrel stuck in it. Strange sight.

    Never seen anything like that produced by a moth

    Can you explain why the huge nest and was the squirrel sick it couldn't get out

  7. #346
    Quote Originally Posted by Cardinal TT View Post
    Never seen anything like that produced by a moth

    Can you explain why the huge nest and was the squirrel sick it couldn't get out
    Caterpillars weave the web-like nests similar to what spiders do but are quite thick and durable. Eggs are laid in that nest that will eventually hatch out and eat, strip all leaves from trees. I may have skipped a step in their life cycle but that is the gist. What we saw was apparently a hungry squirrel that had tried to crawl in to eat the worms. Squirrel ended up stuck in the web like a net and could not climb out. We are returning to that lake this week and will see if we can remove the nest with a rake or something. I want a closer look.

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  9. #347
    Quote Originally Posted by FireBrand View Post
    Caterpillars weave the web-like nests similar to what spiders do but are quite thick and durable. Eggs are laid in that nest that will eventually hatch out and eat, strip all leaves from trees. I may have skipped a step in their life cycle but that is the gist. What we saw was apparently a hungry squirrel that had tried to crawl in to eat the worms. Squirrel ended up stuck in the web like a net and could not climb out. We are returning to that lake this week and will see if we can remove the nest with a rake or something. I want a closer look.

    So it's a large number of caterpillars which makes sense....that would be one scary big caterpillar if it was alone

    We have similar down here but the caterpillars clump together but I haven't seen them make a huge nest like that

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  11. #348
    Senior Member Muriel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FireBrand View Post
    Caterpillars weave the web-like nests similar to what spiders do but are quite thick and durable. Eggs are laid in that nest that will eventually hatch out and eat, strip all leaves from trees. I may have skipped a step in their life cycle but that is the gist. What we saw was apparently a hungry squirrel that had tried to crawl in to eat the worms. Squirrel ended up stuck in the web like a net and could not climb out. We are returning to that lake this week and will see if we can remove the nest with a rake or something. I want a closer look.
    I know it will be gruseome if the squirrel is still in there... but be sure to take lots of pictures!

    Since moths eat leaves, it will be interesting to see what happened with the squirrel remains.

  12. #349
    Senior Member Muriel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cardinal TT View Post
    So it's a large number of caterpillars which makes sense....that would be one scary big caterpillar if it was alone

    We have similar down here but the caterpillars clump together but I haven't seen them make a huge nest like that
    Tent caterpillars. These are social caterpillars (larvae) and the leaves they eat are primarily from cherry or apple trees, or that order of family. Grouping together in the webbed tent, the caterpillars can easily deflect predators with movement together, which may look like the entire nest is writhing or wriggling. After maturing the caterpillars disperse, spin a cocoon, and then hatch into small moths. Smaller moths typically have about a two week lifespan.

    It's not all bad for the tree. Leaves actually regenerate. I've seen this on my own property. Lots of deer pass through my acre, and they will eat my unprotected serviceberry bushes. But, leaves grow back until late in the season. God's created order is just magnificent!

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  14. #350
    Quote Originally Posted by Muriel View Post
    Tent caterpillars. These are social caterpillars (larvae) and the leaves they eat are primarily from cherry or apple trees, or that order of family. Grouping together in the webbed tent, the caterpillars can easily deflect predators with movement together, which may look like the entire nest is writhing or wriggling. After maturing the caterpillars disperse, spin a cocoon, and then hatch into small moths. Smaller moths typically have about a two week lifespan.

    It's not all bad for the tree. Leaves actually regenerate. I've seen this on my own property. Lots of deer pass through my acre, and they will eat my unprotected serviceberry bushes. But, leaves grow back until late in the season. God's created order is just magnificent!
    They are destructive, however. This year the DNR released a type of house-fly appearing insect that helps us in the battle. They were troublesome here but didnt bite. We had a light year for tent worms.

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