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Thread: Rose plant....no buds?

  1. #1

    Rose plant....no buds?

    So last year I planted a hybrid rose plant called a Pretty Lady. After some shocking treatment - being transplanted twice. It really struggled during the summer. And I was concerned that it froze over the winter. But this year, all I see are leaves and stems, no buds to indicate that I should see flowers.

    Isn't that an indication of "sucker" stems? Where they don't produce but just grow. And the plant is truly done?

    I don't really want to loose this plant as it was a gift, and given to me because we lost our dog. And it's a memory plant for her.

    At first I was excited to see the growth....but looking at my neighbors rose bushes and these are well established roses, they have buds and are starting to bloom.

    Any advise? Please.

  2. #2
    As long as it's growing, I would give it some fertilizer and wait and see. I had the same thing happen to a hydrangea, it did not produce any flowers one year. I left it alone and the next year it bloomed as usual.

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  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Susan View Post
    As long as it's growing, I would give it some fertilizer and wait and see. I had the same thing happen to a hydrangea, it did not produce any flowers one year. I left it alone and the next year it bloomed as usual.
    Thanks I will try that. :)

  5. #4
    Since it was transplanted twice it might be concentrating its energy on developing a good root system again before using that energy to make flowers. I agree with Sue, give it a little fertilizer and wait it out.

    BTW, I was curious what it looked like so I googled Pretty Lady...its gorgeous and fragrant too! :)

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  7. #5
    Don't Ban me Bro! John's Avatar
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    When you transplant you lose some root structure, the resulting root mass may not be large enough to support vigorous foliage/flowering. So, whenever you lose roots, you should also trim branches proportionally. If you lose half the roots, chop the plant in half. It does sound like the plant you moved may need some more time to catch up, maybe next year!

    BTW, you should always move a plant when it is in its dormant stage (no leaves).

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  9. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by John View Post
    When you transplant you lose some root structure, the resulting root mass may not be large enough to support vigorous foliage/flowering. So, whenever you lose roots, you should also trim branches proportionally. If you lose half the roots, chop the plant in half. It does sound like the plant you moved may need some more time to catch up, maybe next year!

    BTW, you should always move a plant when it is in its dormant stage (no leaves).
    John, thank you. I actually transplanted it during the active stages. I did not realize that I would lose some root structure. I have trimmed it back, as some of the branches died over the winter. But I hope it will be fine next year.

    Praying that is survives another season, and another winter. :)

  10. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by John View Post
    When you transplant you lose some root structure, the resulting root mass may not be large enough to support vigorous foliage/flowering. So, whenever you lose roots, you should also trim branches proportionally. If you lose half the roots, chop the plant in half. It does sound like the plant you moved may need some more time to catch up, maybe next year!

    BTW, you should always move a plant when it is in its dormant stage (no leaves).
    When you said in the other thread that you ate green beans straight from the plant I wondered if you were a gardener...great advice, you ARE a gardener!

    You're gonna have to share more about what you're growing this year!

  11. #8
    Don't Ban me Bro! John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krystian View Post
    When you said in the other thread that you ate green beans straight from the plant I wondered if you were a gardener...great advice, you ARE a gardener!

    You're gonna have to share more about what you're growing this year!
    Here in FL you can grow things all the time. I just pop seeds around here and there and see what pops up and does well. It is not really seasonal here and in fact many plants do not like the hot summers or the traditional seasons you have up North.

    When I lived up North I had more of a traditional garden, I was doing the organic thing before it was a cool thing. I still have my Troy-Bilt tiller!

    I always get a kick out of how people taste garden produce and say "I've never tasted a green bean like that", or a tomato or whatever. The world consumes Frankenfood!

  12. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by John View Post
    ...I was doing the organic thing before it was a cool thing. I still have my Troy-Bilt tiller!
    Man, you've been holding out on us...you should have a ton of posts in this forum. How large is your garden area and what are you growing this year?

  13. #10
    Don't Ban me Bro! John's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by krystian View Post
    Man, you've been holding out on us...you should have a ton of posts in this forum. How large is your garden area and what are you growing this year?
    Not much going on this year, kinda busy with other stuff but I still stick a few seeds in the ground. Not much to speak of at the moment, a few green beans.

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